In the chapter, the Buddha explains that if suffering beings single-mindedly call his name, this bodhisattva will rescue them from all forms of harm, including fire, flood, shipwreck, murderers, demons, prison, bandits, and wild animals

[…] In the centuries after the sutra was translated into Chinese, miracle stories began to circulate about the bodhisattva’s wondrous powers, how those who called upon him in times of dire need would find that the shackles had fallen from their ankles and the prison door stood open, that their names had been erased from execution lists, that they could walk through hordes of bandits unnoticed, that their houses remained undamaged in the midst of a great fire, that they had been cured of leprosy.

The Story of Buddhism p. 80 paragraph 2 

 NOTE: YOU MAY FIND THE VIDEO I SELECTED TO BE BIAS, BUT I HAVEN’T COME ACROSS ANY VIDEOS ON MODERN MIRACLES ASSOCIATED WITH THE ONE CALLED “AVALOKITESEVARA”.  (PERHAPS IF THERE ARE ANY THEY ARE NOT IN ENGLISH).  WHAT WOULD THE DIFFERENCE BE THOUGH IF THE FRIAR TOLD THE REPORTER THAT HE ATTRIBUTED THE HEALING TO “GUAYANIN”?  EITHER WAY THE FRIAR IS IN A HUMBLE STATE NOT CLAIMING THE GLORY FOR HIMSELF, AND ATTRIBUTES THE MIRACLE TO THE GOODNESS OF THE MULTINAMED ONE WHO DISCERNS THE SOUNDS OF THE WORLD. 

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The lord who looks down

April 21, 2008

 The most famous of these bodhisattvas is Avalokitesvara, the “lord who looks down.”  Indeed, much of the Lotus Sutra’s fame in East Asia derives from one brief chapter, the twenty-fifth chapter devoted to the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara or, as he (she rather) was known in China, Guanyin, “he who discerns the sounds of the world.” 

The Story of Buddhism p. 80 paragraph 2 

Psalm 102:17-20 

Genesis 16:11 

Genesis 29:33 

Exodus 3:7 

Exodus 16:8 

Exodus 22:27 

2 Chronicles 7:14 

 I must add that for Israel, there was a downside to being heard:

Numbers 11:1 

Numbers 14:26-30